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4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
4.8  of 1000+ reviews by Trustpilot   ✔ Tax returns for both US and abroad
US expat taxes Netherlands

US Expat Taxes in the Netherlands: What You Need to Know to Stay Compliant

By January 8th, 2024No Comments4 min read
US expat taxes in the Netherlands made easy. Learn what you need to know about filing US taxes while living abroad with Expats Overseas

As an American living in the Netherlands, filing your U.S. taxes can be a daunting task. With so many considerations to keep in mind, it’s understandable to feel overwhelmed. Expats Overseas is here to help you navigate the complexities of U.S. expat taxes in the Netherlands. This guide will answer some of the most commonly asked questions and highlight how we can help.

US tax obligation

Firstly, it’s important to note that as an American or U.S. Green Card holder living in the Netherlands, you must file a U.S. tax return every year, regardless of where you reside. This is true even if you’re a dual citizen or haven’t lived in the U.S. for years. All your income, including wages, interest, dividends, rental income, and qualified retirement account distributions, is taxable.

It’s crucial to understand that working as a U.S. citizen in the Netherlands can impact your taxes, even if it’s a short-term assignment. As you establish deeper financial roots in the Netherlands, you’ll have more considerations for your American tax filing. For instance, if you earn income while on a short-term assignment, you’ll need to report that income on your U.S. taxes.

FBAR and FATCA filing

If you have more than $10,000 in foreign bank or financial accounts ( all together), you’re subject to FBAR filing and reporting requirements.  Since U.S. tax penalties can be steep, it’s worth speaking to a tax advisor to ensure you’re reporting the correct amount.

Avoid Dual taxation

There are ways to lower your U.S. tax bill and avoid dual taxation, such as the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion and Housing Exclusion, which allow you to exclude up to a certain amount of foreign-earned income if you meet specific requirements. You can also use the Foreign Tax Credit, which allows you to claim a dollar-for-dollar credit on Dutch taxes paid if you meet certain requirements.

PFICs

It’s essential to understand that Dutch tax-free investments and pensions may not be tax-free in the United States. If you have ownership in a Dutch tax-free investment account or pension, it may be treated as a PFIC, triggering a whole host of other reporting requirements. Therefore, it’s critical to learn more about foreign pension taxation.

US Netherlands tax treaty

The U.S. has tax treaties with certain countries, including the Netherlands, and one of the significant provisions is the agreement to comply with FATCA reporting. Under this agreement, the two countries can exchange information about an individual’s financial accounts. It’s worth having an expat tax expert review your documents to ensure you’re reporting the correct amount.

Dutch 30% ruling

You should also be aware of the Dutch 30% ruling, a special tax regime for expats that come to the Netherlands to work. It is a reduced tax rate for a period of time, for these newly arrived expats.

This ruling allows expats to receive a tax-free allowance of 30% of their salary for a maximum of five years. To be eligible, you must meet certain criteria, including having specific skills and expertise and earning a certain salary. It’s essential to work with a knowledgeable tax advisor to determine your eligibility and ensure you’re taking advantage of any available tax benefits. 

Dutch taxes for US citizens

It’s essential to understand the basics of Dutch taxes for U.S. citizens. If you live and work in the Netherlands, you’ll have to file Dutch taxes, and  the tax rates can be as high as 49.5% for high earners. The Dutch Tax Office (Belastingdienst) collects taxes, which are due on April 30 of the following year.

Expats Overseas, one-stop-shop filing for expats

Filing expat taxes in the Netherlands can be a complex process. However, with the help of Expats Overseas, you can navigate the nuances of the U.S. tax code and Dutch tax system. We have a network of expert tax advisors for both your US tax and your local tax who can file your tax return(s)accurately and efficiently.

Prevent double taxation and receive the tax credits you are eligible for. Contact Expats Overseas today to get started.

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